Assembly Experts

Putting all the right pieces together


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Welcome to the Assembly Experts blog. Here we give you tips and advice on building maintenance & construction work in and around your home or business. Please check back from time to time to see the latest news and advice – straight from the handyman professionals.


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POLISHING WOOD FURNITURE

Posted by Assembly Experts on July 9, 2013 at 9:20 AM

POLISHING WOOD FURNITURE

Three DIY Furniture Polish Recipes

 

Once these homemade recipes have been mixed, pour them in clean, labeled glass or plastic containers.

 

Recipe #1

1 cup mineral oil

3 drops lemon oil or extract

 

Recipe #2

2 oz. grated beeswax

5 oz. turpentine

 

Recipe #3

1 cup olive oil

1/4 cup white vinegar

 

The oil nourishes the wood while the vinegar cleans it.

 

Recipes #1 and #2 can be stored in glass or plastic (make sure they’re clean) containers, but #3 should be poured into a spray bottle.

 

Now that the recipes have been made, now it’s time to see how they work. Follow these expert tips:

 

Spray or pour the homemade solution on a soft cloth (never spray directly on the furniture) and work it in, wiping with the grain. Right away you will see the luster return to the wood. If the wood looks dry, let it sit and then go over it one more time with the oil and vinegar.

If the wood has detail work, go over the area well with the cloth and solution, then take a soft-bristle brush to work the solution into the grooves. Buff with a soft cloth.

Now that the furniture is polished and sparkling clean, learn some common problems with wood furniture and ways to solve them:

 

Removing Old, Dull Furniture Polish: Steep two tea bags in boiling water. Let the tea cool to room temperature, take a soft cloth, wring it out in the tea until it’s damp and wash the wood. The tannic acid from the tea is wonderful for maintaining wood. You’ll be surprised at how the wood will shine.

Water and Heat Marks: Apply a little mayonnaise -- not salad dressing -- onto the spots, spread with a finger, let it soak for a few hours to overnight. Wipe and polish the entire table to restore the shine.

Removing Difficult Marks: For even the most difficult marks such as a writing pen, mayonnaise (the all-purpose cleaner) is still the way to go, along with some Rottenstone (a mild pumice). Mix the pumice and mayo, then work the mixture into the spot in the direction of the wood grain. This may take a little time. Reapply as needed, then take a cloth to clean.

Restoring Dry- and Old-Looking Wood: First, don’t throw it out. Restore it. Work some petroleum jelly into the wood with your fingers with a massage action, and if the wood is in really bad shape, leave the jelly on for some time. Finish by working into the grain and buffing with a soft cloth.

http://www.diynetwork.com/decorating/polishing-wood-furniture/index.html

Update light fixtures with a can of spray paint.

Posted by Assembly Experts on July 9, 2013 at 8:10 AM

Update light fixtures with a can of spray paint

Also great on towel bars, etc in the bathroom. Cover with a clear coat for heavy use items (TP holder)



Wood Pallet Projects

Posted by Assembly Experts on July 9, 2013 at 8:00 AM

Wood Pallet Projects

Cool and Easy-to-Make Projects for the Home and Garden.


http://goodshomedesign.com/wood-pallets-decoration-functionality/ ;


Orange Oils- Furniture Polish & Restorer

Posted by Assembly Experts on July 3, 2013 at 8:40 AM

All Surfaces – Indoor and Outdoor

Safe to use on most hard surfaces – not just timber. Use to polish laminated tables and bench tops, stone and marble surfaces, cutting boards or wooden bowls etc. Use on sealed or unsealed wooden furniture, outdoor settings, timber doors and window frames, timber blinds, veneered, plastic or lacquered surfaces.

Application

Before applying furniture polish to particularly dirty surfaces (such as outdoor furniture) clean with damp cloth . Shake bottle well and then apply Orange Oils in small amounts and don’t drown the surface. Work in small sections rather than large areas, and apply in a circular pattern with your ‘wet’ cloth. Buff off Orange Oils after applying (especially on floors and other surfaces that could be slippery) with a dry, lint free ‘buffing’ cloth, the more you buff the better the shine! Follow the direction of the grain on fine furniture.

 Polishing

Many furniture polishes boast orange oil as an ingredient. This is because orange oil helps to polish and shine finished wood to give it back some of the natural luster that is lost over time and use. To use orange oil directly on wood, make your own furniture polish by combining regular water with three drops of orange oil, and spraying on a microfiber cloth to polish furniture to a high shine.

 

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/96467-uses-orange-oil/#ixzz2Xz9NwPdD

http://www.orangepower.com.au/furniture-polish-restorer/

 http://www.restorationsecrets.com/index.php/Home/Index

About Hammers

Posted by Assembly Experts on August 24, 2012 at 10:15 AM

Both the claw hammer and cross-pein hammer are essential in any toolbox and are used to drive in nails. Hammers are sized by the weight of the head. The hardened face is slightly convex (rounded) so it is easier to strike a nail and prevent the hammer marking the work badly

Claw hammers

Claw hammers have claws at the back of the head. They can be pushed firmly under the head of bent or unwanted nails to lever them out. The two common size ranges are 450-570g for site fixing or bench work, and 620-680g for construction and building work.

Warrington or cross-pein hammers

These hammers are used for light joinery work - to small nails or panel pins. It is useful for nailing into corners. A smaller type (also known as a brad hammer) is used for very small brads and tacks. These hammers range in size from 100 to 400g (3.5 to 14oz).

Brad hammer

A smaller type of Warrington or cross-pein hammer used for very small brads and tacks.

The wooden mallet is used to drive chisels and to assemble joinery work where a metal hammer would damage the surface of the job.

A rubber-head mallet may be used to knock joinery together but not for striking chisels or other tools. Take care using these mallets as they may bounce back and cause injury

Source:http://au.lifestyle.yahoo.com/better-homes-gardens

How to Choose the Right Blinds

Posted by Assembly Experts on June 16, 2012 at 9:30 PM

Roller Blinds

Great for an uncluttered look and features a simple operating mechanism, which allows for a smooth up and down motion. The Roller blinds come in a huge colour and fabric selection and also a range of blockout, light filtering, shaped, double, and bonded rollers as well as flame retardant and environmentally friendly options.

Panel Glides

The modern take on vertical blinds, which offer a streamlined look to your windows. Ideal for Sliding Doors, the panels glideinto position and stay neatly to one side. Select from the huge range of decorator fabrics.

Romans

Practical, distinctive, and stylish. Decorate and get ‘the look’ by adding a modern feel to your room with Roman Blinds. Select from the popular custom made range of Classic Roman Blinds with beautiful fabrics in both traditional and modern patterns, you can coordinate to any decor.

Venetians

These blinds offer a timeless and classic line with the ability to accent a favourite room through bringing both function and fashion to any type of window. Available in aluminium, timber style, and warm brasswood, you can select from a wide range of colours, finishes, and slat widths. Venetian Blinds offer privacy and light control, with all of the design flexibility you desire.

Honeycomb

Honeycomb Blinds are both practical and economical energy savers. As one of the highest insulating blinds on the market, the unique hexagonal shaped cell structure traps the warm inside the room. Your room stays warmer in winter and cooler in summer.

Verticals

Popular for covering sliding doors and large windows, Vertical Blinds provide a tried and tested window covering solution. A very versatile blind that gives you privacy when closed and filters light and views when rotated. Available in a range of colours and fabrics perfect for any décor.

Source:http://www.readersdigest.com.au

How to repair melamine edging on shelves and doors

Posted by Assembly Experts on June 16, 2012 at 9:25 PM

Melamine strips on shelving and doors can become chipped and torn. Remove the damaged edge and iron on a new one costing about $10 for a 10 metre roll 21mm wide. Iron-on melamine strip is used to edge timber-based products such as MDF, particleboard or plywood shelving. It comes in a range of colours and veneer finishes and is backed with hot-melt adhesive that bonds when heated with an iron. Remove the old strip by softening the adhesive with a hot iron. Peel off with a scraper, remove remaining adhesive then use 80 grit abrasive paper wrapped around a cork sanding block to smooth, ready for new edging.



How to repair melamine edging on shelves and doors Melamine strips on shelving and doors can become chipped and torn. Remove the damaged edge and iron on a new one costing about $10 for a 10 metre roll 21mm wide. Iron-on melamine strip is used to edge timber-based products such as MDF, particleboard or plywood shelving. It comes in a range of colours and veneer finishes and is backed with hot-melt adhesive that bonds when heated with an iron. Remove the old strip by softening the adhesive with a hot iron. Peel off with a scraper, remove remaining adhesive then use 80 grit abrasive paper wrapped around a cork sanding block to smooth, ready for new edging.

Source:http://www.readersdigest.com.au

How to secure new handles on a cabinet

Posted by Assembly Experts on June 3, 2012 at 9:50 AM

Choose slimline handles when installing cabinetry as they don’t work loose over time. Buy a handle template or make a jig to drill accurate holes. TIP Handles come with machine screws that are usually longer than required. Measure the door thickness plus 3mm then clamp the screw in a vice and use a hacksaw to cut it to length.


 

●1 APPLY MASKING TAPE

On the back of the door apply two strips of tape where the holes will be drilled to prevent melamine breakout as the drill bit exits.

●2 DRILL THE HOLES

Position the jig and use a 2mm bit to drill pilot holes. Remove the jig and use a 5mm bit to drill out the holes.

TIP Drilling oversized holes allows a small amount of screw movement to engage the screw thread.

●3 FIT THE HANDLES

Remove burrs from the end of the screw thread with a metal file then push the screw through the door from inside and wind it into the handle. Repeat for the other screw then secure the handle against the door.


http://www.readersdigest.com.au

Using drill bits

Posted by Assembly Experts on May 19, 2012 at 9:00 PM

Ensure the bit size and type suits the material being drilled and the requirements for the pilot or clearance hole. The bit should be straight and tight in the chuck.

Types of drill bits

■ TWIST BITS have a cone-shaped cutting point and are suitable for various materials. 

■ MASONRY BITS have a hardened tungsten carbide point.

■ BRAD POINT BITS have a sharp centre point for accurate hole positioning in timber.

■ SPADE BITS are flat with cutting spurs on the edges for timber. 

■ MULTI-CONSTRUCTION BITS are ideal for drilling one hole through a combination of materials.

Source:http://www.readersdigest.com.au

Fix a wobbly bookcase

Posted by Assembly Experts on May 19, 2012 at 9:00 PM

STEP 1

Add the side panels

Cut two 290 x 19mm pine panels. Unscrew the legs and move them outwards to be refixed with oversized coach screws through the holes in the legs. Secure the pine panels to the legs and cross supports using 40mm x 8g timber screws.

STEP 2

Secure cork tiles

Attach three cork tiles to each pine panel, using a utility knife to cut them to fit, marking the setout with equal spacing all around. Apply adhesive to the panel and back of the cork and press into place.

STEP 3

Add a cross brace

On the inside of the back legs, mark 200mm from the top and base, measuring between the marks diagonally to cut two lengths of 6mm mild steel rod. Flatten the ends and the crossover point with a hammer. Heating the ends of the rod with a blowtorch to cherry-red will make them more malleable. drill clearance holes then secure with 15mm x 8g buttonhead screws.

TIP Use an angle grinder with a metal cutting disc to cut the steel rod, clamping it in a vice for a firm grip.


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